“Dagashi Kashi” Gets Crushed In Half

Second season of candy eating obsession anime Dagashi Kashi has been confirmed to have only 15 minutes per episode. Upcoming alcohol comedy adaptation Takunomi will get the other 15 minutes to complete the time slot.

These two unrelated anime sharing only the similarity about being indulgent in unhealthy foods will be airing all their new episodes together, back to back, with Dagashi Kashi coming first.

In the past, anime series were granted 26 episodes no questions asked. Sadly as times have changed, we have seen that number halved to 13, then reduced further down to 12, and even in some cases, 11 and 10. It’s hoped that this announcement today is an isolated incident and not part of a larger effort in the ongoing trend to reduce anime screen time.

The reason this has been happening is it has become evident as the industry matured that anime alone is not a profitable business in most cases, however, it can be a powerful marketing tool to promote merchandise and other much more profitable media, like manga and novels. Consequently, the concept is to have these shorter anime series act as commercials for the real money makers.

Dagashi Kashi for instance was an immediate success upon its manga debut and has enjoyed rapid sales increases ever since the anime. As far as the publishers are concerned, the anime itself doesn’t really matter.

This attitude towards anime has grown increasingly obvious over the years, not only in the reduction of episode count, but in the quality of animation, artwork, character designs, and investment in other creative factors key to delivering a heavy-hitting anime.

Indeed, we can see this in the decidedly average Dagashi Kashi as well and also likely the soon to arrive Takunomi.

Comments

2 comments on ““Dagashi Kashi” Gets Crushed In Half”
  1. misaofan says:

    “This attitude towards anime has grown increasingly obvious over the years, not only in the reduction of episode count, but in the quality of animation, artwork, character designs, and investment in other creative factors key to delivering a heavy-hitting anime.”

    I think it is also the fault of the Japanese nation generally nowadays, with decreasing birth rate, worsening creativity in terms of media, and Shinzo Abe among others. This was just the small part of the heightened national issue that might as well applies to the rest of the world too.

    I don’t think I could stand watching much seasonal anime anymore unless it is magical girl (simply heroine action stuff in general) or sometimes anime original so I think watching older anime might be a good alternative for me. I will try watching Modern Magic Made Simple to fullfill that quota.

    Like

    1. Seven says:

      Calling it the fault of the Japanese nation would suggest they consider it a problem in the first place, but Japanese animation started and continues to develop in Japan. The way it is now is just representative of what they think it should be.

      At the end of the day, wanting to be a good artist seems to have become as impractical as ever unless you just make ero-doujinshi.

      Like

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